Controversial as it may be, there’s a compelling case for trying a ChatterBait on braided fishing line. While acknowledging that this approach contrasts with Brett Hite’s established technique, it’s worth exploring for those who grew up with a different fishing background.

Before the ChatterBait era, spinnerbaits, buzzbaits, and swim jigs were the go-to lures in muddy waters. Raised on this approach, the author’s father favored braided line. In the 90s, when braid resurfaced, it replaced monofilament. The author, having started with braided line on a 7-foot medium-heavy spinnerbait rod, found it natural and effective.

So why stick with braided line? The author contends that, especially in low-visibility water and around abrasive cover like rocks and logs, braided line offers advantages over fluorocarbon. The lack of stretch in the line enhances sensitivity, allowing constant contact with the bait. This is crucial for fishing around dense vegetation and wood, where a vibrating jig might otherwise hang up frequently.

While acknowledging that the choice between braid and fluorocarbon is a matter of personal preference, the author emphasizes the comfort and adaptability associated with one’s fishing background. The sensitivity of braided line aids in feeling every movement of the ChatterBait, allowing for a quick response to changes in the bait’s behavior.

For those unfamiliar with braided line, the heightened sensitivity might lead to misinterpreting encounters with cover as bites, potentially causing more hang-ups. The author shares the specifics of their setup, advocating for a 40-pound Sufix 832 Braid paired with a 7.5:1 Lew’s Super Duty LFS Casting Reel for shallow fishing. Rod choice depends on the fishing environment, ranging from a 7-foot medium-heavy to a 7-foot, 3-inch medium-heavy Fitzgerald Fishing Vursa.

The author encourages anglers to try fishing a ChatterBait on braided line. While it might not suit everyone, it could open new possibilities for those seeking an effective, sensitivity-enhancing approach. The goal, after all, is to make the most of one’s time on the water and enjoy the thrill of catching fish.

Images/Source: Wired2Fish