Fishing with a buzzbait is a tried-and-true method for landing big bass all year round, but in the spring, a few strategic adjustments can lead to even greater success. Renowned angler Greg Hackney shares his top four tips for effectively using buzzbaits to target spawning bass during the spring season.

1. Bend Wire for Clacking Sound As spring brings bass into a spawning mood, Hackney modifies his buzzbait by bending the wire so that the blade makes contact with the head, creating a distinctive clacking sound. This defensive sound triggers more aggressive strikes from the big females guarding their nests, making it a crucial adjustment for springtime success.

2. Use Straight Braid To maximize hook-up ratios during the defensive strikes provoked by the clacking buzzbait, Hackney opts for straight braid instead of fluorocarbon. Braid offers minimal stretch, ensuring solid hook sets even in thick cover where bass often lurk during the spawn. The choice between braid and fluorocarbon also depends on the fish’s mood and the type of cover present.

3. Pull Bait into the Wind In windy conditions, Hackney recommends fishing the buzzbait into the wind to enhance the bait’s performance. By pulling the bait against the wind, more water is pushed onto the blade, creating optimal noise and vibration to attract bass. Additionally, fishing into the wind helps the bait ride smoothly over waves, preventing it from being submerged by oncoming swells.

4. Match Toad Size and Color to Conditions Pairing a toad trailer with the buzzbait, Hackney adjusts the size and color of the trailer based on water clarity and retrieve speed. In murky water, a larger toad allows for a slower retrieve, while clearer conditions call for a downsized toad and faster retrieve. Experimentation with color and retrieve speed can help entice hesitant bass to commit to the bait, ultimately leading to more hook-ups.

By incorporating these expert tips into your spring buzzbait fishing strategy, you can increase your chances of landing trophy bass during this prime fishing season.

Image: NebraskaLand
Source: Wired2Fish